Star Stuff, Carl Sagan and the Mysteries of the Cosmos

For today’s Perfect Picture Book Friday selection, I’m sharing one of my favorite biographies. Now three years old, it still stands as a primo example of a biography for kids. Title: Star Stuff, Carl Sagan and the Mysteries of the Cosmos Written and Illustrated by: Stephanie Roth Sisson Roaring Brook Press, 2014, biography Suitable for … More Star Stuff, Carl Sagan and the Mysteries of the Cosmos

Some Writer!

Some Fridays, I share middle grade titles. Others, I share picture books. Today, I offer a special combo – a middle grade biography filled with pictures. Check it out! Title: Some Writer! The Story of E.B.White Written and Illustrated by: Melissa Sweet Hougton Miflin Harcourt, biography 2016, 176 pp. Suitable for ages: 7-10 Lexile: 1030 … More Some Writer!

Funny Bones: Posada and His Day of the Dead Calaveras

An incredibly interesting and engaging book… Title: Funny Bones: Posada and His Day of the Dead Calaveras Written and illustrated by: Duncan Tonatiuh Abrams Books for Young Readers, 2015, biography, 40 pages Suitable for ages: 6-10 (and older) Themes/topics: art, Mexico, Day of the Dead Opening: Skeletons riding bicycles…skeletons wearing fancy hats…skeletons dancing and strumming … More Funny Bones: Posada and His Day of the Dead Calaveras

Mining for Heart: “Writing a Picture Book Biography? So What?” by Barb Rosenstock

When anyone can look up anything, what makes a story different than a Wikipedia entry? What is it that lingers after a child reads a book, bringing new perspective and inspiring thinking? To me, that’s heart, the most essential and difficult part of writing. It’s a thread that you won’t find in the research, but something that comes from the research. It might hit ten seconds before sleep, during a walk, while reading something entirely unrelated, or may never surface at all. Barb Rosenstock, author of a number of picture book biographies, calls it the “So What?” … More Mining for Heart: “Writing a Picture Book Biography? So What?” by Barb Rosenstock